may be / maybe

may be / maybe
   May be as two words means "might be": Your reading glasses may be on the night stand.
   Maybe is one word that means "perhaps": Maybe your reading glasses are on the night stand.

Confused words. 2014.

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  • may be / maybe —    May be as two words means might be : Your reading glasses may be on the night stand.    Maybe is one word that means perhaps : Maybe your reading glasses are on the night stand …   Confused words

  • may|be — «MAY bee», adverb, noun. –adv. it may be; possibly; perhaps: »Maybe you ll have better luck later. –n. a possibility or probability; uncertainty: »There are lots of maybes in this glittering promise (New York Times). Usage maybe …   Useful english dictionary

  • Maybe (No Angels song) — Maybe Single by No Angels from the album Destiny B side Secret s Out …   Wikipedia

  • Maybe It's Me (TV series) — Maybe It s Me Intertitle Format Sitcom Created by Suzanne Martin …   Wikipedia

  • maybe — may|be W2S1 [ˈmeıbi] adv [sentence adverb] 1.) used to say that something may happen or may be true but you are not certain = ↑perhaps ▪ Maybe it s all just a big misunderstanding. ▪ Do you think he ll come back? Maybe. ▪ Maybe they re right, but …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Maybe Tomorrow — may refer to: Albums: Maybe Tomorrow (The Iveys album), or the title song (see below) Maybe Tomorrow (The Jackson 5 album), or the title song (see below) Maybe Tomorrow, an album by The Rembrandts Songs: Maybe Tomorrow (Goldenhorse song) Maybe… …   Wikipedia

  • Maybe (Jay Sean song) — Maybe Single by Jay Sean from the album My Own Way B side …   Wikipedia

  • Maybe I'm Amazed — Song by Paul McCartney from the album McCartney Released 17 April 1970 Genre Rock Language English …   Wikipedia

  • Maybe Monday — Origin United States Genres Electroacoustic improvisation, experimental Years active 1997–present Labels Winter Winter, Intakt …   Wikipedia

  • maybe — an adverb meaning ‘perhaps’, is such a familiar part of current standard English that it comes as a surprise to know that it fell out of use in the 19c to an extent that caused the OED to label it ‘archaic and dialect’. It has a somewhat informal …   Modern English usage

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